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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of Effect of rock dust on explosibility of coal dust found in the catalog.

Effect of rock dust on explosibility of coal dust

J. K. Richmond

Effect of rock dust on explosibility of coal dust

by J. K. Richmond

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  • 33 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines in Pittsburgh .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dust explosions.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby J. K Richmond, I. Liebman, and L. F. Miller.
    SeriesReport of investigations - Bureau of Mines -- 8077
    ContributionsLiebman, I. joint author., Miller, L. F. joint author., United States. Bureau of Mines
    The Physical Object
    Paginationii, 34 p. :
    Number of Pages34
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22418938M

    initiation energy of the coal dust, and the MAIT of a coal dust layer The MAIT for a coal dust cloud, from a hot surface source, has been investigated in the past decades by many researchers. In a study conducted by Cao,42 the MAIT of a coal dust cloud was investi-gated using a Godbert‐Greenwald (GG) furnace. Cao observed that. Effect of Rock Dust on Explosibility of Coal Dust. U.S. Department of the Interior; Bureau of Mines: (RI ). [Google Scholar] Richmond JK, Liebman I, Bruszak AE, Miller LF. Proceedings of the Seventeenth Symposium (International) on by: 1.

    – light rock dust – dark coal dust • Hand held • MSHA IS approved • Efficient method to determine explosibility of the dust mixture • Can help mine operators – reduce the danger of operating under hazardous conditions – help provide a better balance o rock dust application o coal dust File Size: 3MB. Abstract. An absorption/desorption model of particle reactivity was employed to describe the observed relationship between two apparently diverse phenomena which have been the subject of considerable study at the U.S. Bureau of Mines, viz. (1) coal/rock dust reflectance and (2) coal/rock dust explosibility.

    Coal Dust Explosibility Meter (CDEM) Accumulations of combustible dust in coal mines create the risk of large-scale explosions that can result in multiple deaths and traumatic injuries. The explosion hazard can be effectively controlled through the application of rock dust, such as limestone dust, to render inert the combustible coal dust. The study revealed that the proportion of rock dust required to inert the coal dust explosion increases with the decrease in the coal dust size and increase in the rock dust size.


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Effect of rock dust on explosibility of coal dust by J. K. Richmond Download PDF EPUB FB2

2 Effects of Rock Dust Applications on Coal Mine Dust Measurements The practice of rock dusting involves the use of an inert rock dust material applied to the surfaces of an underground coal mine. The statement of task for this study (see Appendix A) asks the committee to assess the effects of rock dust mixtures and their application, as required by current U.S.

regulations, on respirable coal mine dust : Division on Earth. Early research on coal dust explosions by the federal Bureau of Mines and in other countries is reviewed to examine the effect of a single inhibitor, rock dust, on the explosion limits of coal dust.

The parameters studied in this research included coal dust fineness, volatile content, and type of initiation.

Effect of rock dust on explosibility of coal dust (OCoLC) Online version: Richmond, J.K. (James Kenneth). Effect of rock dust on explosibility of coal dust (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: J K Richmond; I Liebman; L F Miller.

Effects of Rock Dust Applications on Coal Mine Dust Measurements. The practice of rock dusting involves the use of an inert rock dust material applied to the surfaces of an underground coal mine. amounts of limestone rock dust required to inert the coals.

The effects of coal volatility and particle size were evaluated, and particle size was determined to be at least as important as volatility in determining the explosion hazard. For all coals tested, the finest sizes were the most hazardous.

The coal dust explosibility data are compared to those of other hydrocarbons, suchCited by: The relationship between the explosion inerting effectiveness of rock dusts on coal dusts, as a function of the specific surface area (cm 2 /g) of each component is examined through the use of L explosion chamber testing.

More specifically, a linear relationship is demonstrated for the rock dust to coal dust (or incombustible to combustible) content of such inerted mixtures with the Cited by: 5.

Chinese coal mines also spread the rock dust in the underground to cover the exposed coal. It is required that the incombustible content of combined coal and rock dusts must be at least 60% or 90% when the CH 4 concentration is over %.

The quality of rock dust must meet the following quality requirements: (1) the combustible content Cited by: 6. explosibility of coal and rock dust mixtures, to more effectively improve the onsite adequacy of rock dusting for explosion prevention.

Mine operators could use the CDEM on a regular basis to ensure that their rock dusting practices are achieving inertization File Size: 2MB. Request PDF | Influence of specific surface area on coal dust explosibility using the L chamber | The relationship between the explosion inerting effectiveness of rock dusts on coal dusts, as a.

The inerting effects of specific surface area are examined for both coal and rock dust. A linear relationship is shown of the inerting ratio of rock to coal dust to the surface area ratios of coal to rock by: 5.

In light of the above findings and given the need for a more definitive characterization of rock dust that is effective for inerting a propagating coal dust explosion, NIOSH researchers undertook an investigation of the rock dust particle size effects on explosibility in a L by: The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) specification for rock dust used in underground coal mines, as defined by 30 CFRrequires 70% of the material to pass through a mesh.

Figure 16 shows data on the amount of limestone rock dust required to inert various sizes of Pittsburgh (hvb) and Pocahontas (lvb) coals from Tables 2 and 3. The vertical axis shows the amount of rock dust in the coal and rock dust mixture. The horizontal axis is the mass median particle diameter of the by: Effect of rock dust on explosibility of coal dust / By J.

(James Kenneth) Richmond, joint author. Miller, joint author. (Israel) Liebman and United States. Bureau of Mines. Abstract. es bibliographical of access: Internet Topics. The parameters measured included minimum explosible concentrations, maximum explosion pressures, maximum rates of pressure rise, minimum oxygen concentrations, and amounts of limestone rock dust required to inert the coals.

The effects of coal volatility and particle size were evaluated, and particle size was determined to be at least as Cited by: Research has shown that particle size has a significant impact on the explosibility of coal dust/rock dust mixtures.

Previous explosion studies conducted using the U.S. Bureau of Mines’ (BOM) L explosion chamber tend to show a difference in the amount of inerting material needed to prevent an explosion when compared to the L Siwek chamber. Coal dust explosions in underground coal mines are prevented by generous application of rock dust (usually limestone).

If an explosion should occur, the rock dust disperses, mixes with the coal dust and prevents flame propagation by acting as a thermal inhibitor or heat sink. This paper reports US Bureau of Mines (USBM) research on the explosibility of coal dusts. The purpose of this work is to improve safety in mining and other industries that process or use coal.

Most of the tests were conducted in the USBM 20 litre laboratory explosibility chamber. The laboratory data show relatively good agreement with those from full-scale experimental mine tests. This report details the results of a NIOSH investigation on the ability of the Coal Dust Explosibility Meter (CDEM) to accurately predict the explosibility of samples of coal and rock dust mixtures collected from underground coal mines in the U.S.

The testing was conducted with a prototype version of the CDEM that was available in The. The effect of σ D on coal dust explosibility had been experimentally investigated.

τ values gave insights of the effects of D 50, σ D and dust concentration on burning velocity. D 3,2 and σ D proved to be very important parameters on risk assessment evaluation of coal dust. Typical explosion parameters of coal dust were analyzed in terms of different definitions of particle by:.

The coal dust explosibility data are compared to those of other hydrocarbons, such as polyethylene dust and methane gas, in an attempt to understand better the basics of coal combustion. Peer Reviewed Journal Article - January If by mischance a body of fire damp is ignited in a mine, the force of the explosion may be terrific, but the effect is local unless dry coal dust is present, or unless (as it very rarely happens) an explosible mixture of methane gas and air extends through large areas of the mine.Additional Physical Format: Online version: Rice, George S.

(George Samuel), Explosibility of coal dust (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National .